Daily Archive: Maio 1, 2019

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Sound Waves: The Symphony of Physics

Dr Helen Czerski examines the world of sound waves

Dr Helen Czerski investigates the extraordinary science behind the everyday sounds we hear and those that we normally cannot hear. Dr Helen Czerski takes us on a sonic odyssey through the sounds of the universe – to reveal what the physics of sound can tell us about the world and …

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The Transit of Venus

Special episode of the factual science series exploring the transit of venus across the face of the sun. At 11pm on 5th June 2012 this event will be visible to the naked eye.

Liz Bonnin presents a Horizon special about a rare and beautiful event in our solar system, one that we should all be able to see for ourselves – the transit of Venus across the face of the sun. It will start just before midnight of the 5th of June, and …

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What Is Reality?

The quest to explain the nature of reality is one of the great scientific detective stories. Are we are part of a cosmic hologram? Do we exist in an infinity of parallel worlds?

There is a strange and mysterious world that surrounds us, a world largely hidden from our senses. The quest to explain the true nature of reality is one of the great scientific detective stories.

Clues have been pieced together from deep within the atom, from the event horizon of black …

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Leonardo: The Man Who Saved Science

Leonardo da Vinci is well known for his inventions as well as his art. But new evidence shows that many of his ideas were realized long before he sketched them out in his notebooks — some even 1,700 years before. Was Leonardo a copycat?

Leonardo da Vinci is, of course, best known as one of the world’s greatest artists. At his death in 1519, he was famous for such masterpieces as the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. But he was more than a painter, he was also a musician, writer, and showman. …

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Dancing in the Dark – The End of Physics?

A look at dark matter and dark energy ahead of the Large Hadron Collider being switched on in March 2015, having been upgraded

Scientists genuinely don’t know what most of our universe is made of. The atoms we’re made from only make up four per cent. The rest is dark matter and dark energy (for ‘dark’, read ‘don’t know’). The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been upgraded. When it’s switched on in …